EPL Fantasy Soccer Winner – Season 2018/19

This past weekend saw the huge climax to the 2018/19 Fantasy Soccer Season, with the final round of EPL games being played.

So many shocks throughout the season, no one thought Utd would be so bad, Cardiff would get any points, and once again Pep rotated at the worst times.

For the majority of the season, Michael Harrison was leading but couldn’t handle the pressure in the business end of the season  and dropped like a stone relying on Brighton players for points. A shout out to Josh Conklin for finishing as the highest Fremont YSC player even though he forgot he was playing, and once again Dai finished as the highest staff member in what was a poor display from the coaches.

Our Winner – Graham McMonagle

A newbie to soccer, Graham started out late as a soccer enthusiast missing out on a youth playing career to concentrate on golf. Originally a Man Utd fan back in the glory days, Graham turned his support towards Cardiff City, but once they were relegated the first time he then settled for Spurs. For now Graham is a huge Spurs fan.

It has been a long season, and even more difficult than normal with so many Liverpool players doing so well, but I cannot wait for next season to get started.

Thank you to everyone who took part, and the next season cannot come soon enough. See you next season where we hope to see many new participants.

Fremont YSC at the Quakes

A great night had by everyone, and another Earthquakes win for the season.

Fremont YSC players took part in walking on the teams, and for 11 lucky players they got to walk out with FC Cincinnati for the pregame lineups and anthem.

Another group of players also got to line up to high five the Earthquakes players as they participated in their warm.

We look forward to our next game experience.

Hydration

Hydration is important no matter what time of the year, and no matter the weather conditions. However, with the temperature starting to rise it is important to be aware of the increased amount of water lost not just during games/practices, but also throughout the day through sweat.

One of the ways parents can best support the player is not by shouting at them from the sidelines, but making sure players have the items they need, and making sure the player have their water is very important and also important for their health.

Please make sure you are providing water for players when leaving for practice, but they must be accountable for taking responsibility in taking their water with them and throwing away (recycling) their used bottles.

Here is some information about the importance of hydration – https://www.soccertoday.com/hydration-for-soccer-players-what-to-drink-when/?fbclid=IwAR0G1q3-WZrjTy1K-9Dpubb0mZbYFzWoT1Bn7-RrYq8Hxf_8MpHMgrN5-3M

Over $53,000 awarded in Financial Aid

For the 2018/19 season, Fremont YSC awarded over $53,000 in Financial Aid to it’s players, this doesn’t even include the available financial aid for Recreation, Camps, and Afterschool’s programs.

No player should miss out on playing due to financial reasons, youth sports should be accessible to all.

With a centralized club structure, all financial aid applications are confidential, without any player or coach knowledge of those receiving financial aid. At the same time Fremont YSC provides qualified coaches for all of its Competitive teams, and provides continued education for all of it’s coaches.

Session Cancelled – 3/27/2019

Tonight’s practices at 4.30pm to 5.50pm have been cancelled due to the weather conditions.

Showers throughout the day have been very heavy, and with the rain starting we have decided to cancel the first session of the evening. All other sessions are scheduled to go ahead as planned, weather permitting.

Stay warm and stay safe on the roads.

Congratulations – Jaime Robles, National Letter of Intent

A huge Congratulations to Jaime Robles, former Fremont YSC player.

http://www.hornetsports.com/sports/msoc/2018-19/releases/20190104kpyxm7

Jaime began his soccer adventure in the U8 program when the academy structure was first put in place. As a player rostered to the 00 Boys Black, Jaime was with us all the way up to U16 to where he then went on to the San Jose Earthquakes Academy, and then Portland Timbers Academy. Jaime also spent time in Mexico experiencing the soccer culture.

The Robles family have been with Fremont YSC for over 10 years, and sadly moved to Modesto just this past month. Max and Alma were both very popular on their teams and throughout the club, and we still see Max occasionally practicing with us and playing in games when possible on his visits back to the Bay.

Congratulations to Jaime and the family, and best of luck with the future.

Recreation Coach Education, We’re Ready to Go

Tonight we have our coach education session for the Spring 2019 volunteer coaches.

The volunteers are a huge asset to recreational sports, and put a lot of time and effort in to making the youth game a fun and enjoyable event for everyone.

We have a volunteer coach pathway that will support the volunteer coach from U6 up to our oldest age groups. Starting out the volunteers are supported by our high school players. It’s not just the parents and players that are important in development, our coaches both volunteer and qualified are also an important part of the development process.

We hope that you all say a huge thank you to the coaches when you see then.

Growth and Maturation

Age appropriate development is quite often reduced to just the birth year of a player. When we only assign players by their birth year we are only considering the chronological age of the player. Different ages include – chronological, biological, relative age, and training age, four variations on an individuals area of growth and maturation.

First we need to understand what is the difference between growth and maturation.

Growth is the physical and quantifiable process in development. An example being the change in height., you get physically taller and is measurable.

Maturation is the development of individual and behavioral characteristics through growth. Generally, less quantifiable and is more emotional, and intellectual, where organisms grow within structure. An example, brain development resulting with an ability to handle more complex tasks.


Playing up is often a very broad phrase we use, and the reason for doing so is quite often for the wrong reasons. Playing up an age group is not as simple as the ‘best’ player or the ‘biggest’ player moving up in to an older age group, there are considerations to be made for all pillars of the players long term development.

Technical/Tactical – a player may be technically good and capable of individually playing with older players, but are they tactically as aware as older players who have more playing experience?

Physical – a bigger player may need to be more challenged technically so needs to play with players of similar physical makeup, this will show their reliance on their size. Is this player though at a same rate of maturation as the others of similar size and body shape?

Psychological – a player who is going through their stage of Peak Height Velocity can find themselves now playing with bigger players if moved up an age group, but during this rate of growth can be going through a difficult period with their technical ability. As the body changes they need to be able to adapt to their bodies movements. The psychological damage of a lack in confidence and now not being able to compete can be very detrimental.

Social – players playing up with older players can miss out on important social interactions and can be exposed to inappropriate social environments. It is a very delicate situation when players can also miss out on necessary social experiences with other players of same chronological age, and this social development can be key to long term future of the individual in to adulthood.


The youth soccer environment is an incredibly difficult environment to be able to properly implement playing up and down for the benefit of the player, as a result of the win at all cost mentality, and tournament/league emphasis on chronological age ‘champions’. This is another example of how development and winning philosophies cannot coexist.

At Fremont YSC we will do out best to address all of these considerations through our structure and long term development model, through practice set up with club training, and the progressions through the age appropriate curriculum’s. For further information click on your age specific presentation on understanding age and player expectations –

An interesting article from Changing the Game Project – https://changingthegameproject.com/child-play-dos-donts-moving-kids-older-age-groups/?fbclid=IwAR1H0RqeGOK5BC1fP80WWim3Xwig1pwdxWy_a9qXrlcCk-dxIJ1oorIWc7c

Games are Coming!

We are just a few weeks away from the start of the Spring season, we are now at a time that is equivalent to waiting inline for a roller-coaster ride!

Before we get stuck in to the playing of the games it is important that we cover some very important issues, making sure we are all pulling in the same direction, expectations are managed, and we make sure the experience is about the youth player and not the adult.

The focus must remain on the individual player, the progress and development primarily with the ball at their feet, the comfort to be in possession of the ball, and the willingness to try and at times ultimately fail.


As soon as we lose sight of the big picture and only focus on the scoreline, it is the child that misses out, and the adults take over. Here are a few important factors to keep in mind.

A good coach does not joystick

Joy-sticking is killing the game, stifling youth development, and wrecking the interpretation of what a good coach is.

Joy-sticking is the constant shouting of instruction at the player. While shouting at the player so they make your decision from the sideline on the field, the worst of all joy-sticking is when giving instructions to the player in possession of the ball. The kids are not mini-PlayStation’s living out FIFA in real life. This is not coaching.  A good coach will be looking away from the ball, providing guidance to players and not telling them what to do, but providing information to help them find the answer.

Here is a great article to help understand what joy-sticking is – https://www.stack.com/a/what-is-joysticking-the-coaching-tactic-killing-youth-sports?fbclid=IwAR2dgs-CuL6oRLZPBFyy1dpIsDWsup35ak-5IAS9AOXtse_NEFXNFbICyJ8

Shouting at players is not coaching

Shouting at players is sadly a cultural thing, which for so long has been the benchmark of what is a good coach. The louder and more often the coach shouts, the better that coach must be. This is so painfully wrong.

When we put this in to context, we have an adult shouting at a child while they are playing, and trying to learn, when we break it down to this it’s easier to see why it is so inappropriate. If another child was to shout at a child like this while playing we would consider it bullying, so why is it O.K. for a ‘coach’ to do this. There is a huge dropout rate at 14 years old of youths playing sports, from pressure and abusive adults. Changing the Game Project highlights why this form of coaching is so toxic – https://changingthegameproject.com/abusive-coaching-tolerated-sports/?fbclid=IwAR3YFbXwpaPSzUPD9XDYO74GfLq5D6tWh1kv09IhyNelI6QZyUevcJLrBUc

Psychological Development is an Important Pillar

More and more we are hearing about retired professional players suffering from mental illness. This is the result of their career as an elite professional, and the experience of the old ‘hair dryer’ treatment they would receive from coaches. As research and coach education has developed over the recent years our understanding of player psychology has taken on a greater role. When we put this into the perspective of youths playing sports, the more we reflect the adult game on to children the more damage we are doing. The following is a great little clip from TalkSport where there is an example of an older coach still not considering the impact a coach has on the mental health of a player.